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Among Western gamers, they found that a red message warning about the counterproductive results of negative behavior — such as, “Teammates perform worse if you harass them after a mistake” — led to a bigger drop in players having a bad attitude toward their teammates or insulting other players than the same message displayed in white.

A blue message highlighting the benefits of positive behavior also helped reduce toxic behavior.

“In terms of using big data, I doubt Riot is the only game company using player tracking and so forth,” Madigan says.

“But I think they are unique in how they’re taking an experimental approach that is more scientific.”Riot’s relative transparency about its aims puts it ahead of the pack, as most companies don’t publicize how they tinker with the online experiences of millions of customers.

Riot Games and Facebook are not alone in toying with user behavior.Though it looks whimsical, League of Legends is deeply competitive, leading some emotional players to spew insults that cover the spectrum of racist and sexist slurs.Similar behavior often goes unpunished on Internet forums and on social media.Lin and his Riot colleagues wanted to see if they could use color to influence League of Legends gamers to act more cooperatively within their five-person teams and display less rude or toxic behavior toward other players.In one study, called the “Optimus Experiment,” they tested five categories of messages displayed to players in red and blue, with white serving as a baseline for comparison.

Riot Games and Facebook are not alone in toying with user behavior.

Though it looks whimsical, League of Legends is deeply competitive, leading some emotional players to spew insults that cover the spectrum of racist and sexist slurs.

Similar behavior often goes unpunished on Internet forums and on social media.

Lin and his Riot colleagues wanted to see if they could use color to influence League of Legends gamers to act more cooperatively within their five-person teams and display less rude or toxic behavior toward other players.

In one study, called the “Optimus Experiment,” they tested five categories of messages displayed to players in red and blue, with white serving as a baseline for comparison.

The experiment turned up some surprising results, too.