Updating french provincial furniture

27-Apr-2020 00:24

I followed the same directions as stated with priming and painting, and spray painted the hardware with regular silver spray paint.

I was pleasantly surprised by the absence of paint smell coming from the piece just a few hours later.

But, I was on a schedule.) Oh, by the way, I only needed one can of primer and clear coat. Thanks to my less than stellar job at covering evenly with the yellow, and thanks to a few “particulates”, I was forced to do some distressing after the last coat to have the overall look congruent.

(Not my original plan.) My trusty cabinet blade/scraper did well for that, followed up by acetone on a rag.

Jean-Christophe Burckhardt of Master Artisan Online Magazine notes that fabrics used for French Provincial pieces were inspired by a myriad of international influences, including India, Italy, China and Islamic Moors of Spain.

High Gloss Furniture With Automotive Paint I was lured in by the smooth shine of something glossy.

One day I was fine painting with chalk paint and putting satin and matte finishes on things, then Lisa comes back from a Texas flea market with the most beautiful, glossy, blue dresser you’ve ever seen.

I decided that very day that I had to figure this out, and give auto paint a whirl.

(I just followed the instructions on back of paint cans.) -Husky paint sprayer. AND, I covered anything I didn’t want turning yellow from the overspray.

(This post is yet another example of getting swept up in the momentum of doing something I haven’t done before.

My brain is commandeered by ideas and I just have to scoot over to the passenger seat and get comfortable.) Before Shop primer, paint, and clear coat found at my local Pep Boys.

(I rubbed the acetone rag over the scraped parts to make the “distressed” detail blend.) Nice.

I also sanded some of the orange peel texture that mysteriously showed up under daylight. I waited to distress and clear coat until the next day (as you might have noticed by the sudden sunlight in the photos.) That had nothing to do with drying time, (once again, this stuff dries fast) it had everything to do with my desire to see it during daylight before I went further.

(I just followed the instructions on back of paint cans.) -Husky paint sprayer. AND, I covered anything I didn’t want turning yellow from the overspray.(This post is yet another example of getting swept up in the momentum of doing something I haven’t done before.My brain is commandeered by ideas and I just have to scoot over to the passenger seat and get comfortable.) Before Shop primer, paint, and clear coat found at my local Pep Boys.(I rubbed the acetone rag over the scraped parts to make the “distressed” detail blend.) Nice.I also sanded some of the orange peel texture that mysteriously showed up under daylight. I waited to distress and clear coat until the next day (as you might have noticed by the sudden sunlight in the photos.) That had nothing to do with drying time, (once again, this stuff dries fast) it had everything to do with my desire to see it during daylight before I went further.(One can might have been fine had I not been so spotty with my application. Plus, it didn’t help that it was night time, and I felt blind.