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13-Sep-2019 06:48

If you buy an old one, you will most likely end up having EV replace the element due to rotten internal foam.Then you will have a 'new' one anyways, and it will have cost you more than just buying new to begin with.Many of these vintage microphones still in existence “work”, but the majority of the crystal and ceramic style microphone elements have aged/deteriorated/been abused/etc…to the point where they do not have a usable output, or do not have tonal characteristics suitable for use and/or will not endure the pressure that comes from playing while cupped in the hands.I cannot tell you how many microphones I have been asked to “re-build” or “modify” over the years because players have been told they are buying a “working condition” microphone, and it either does not work well at all, or the tone is completely unsuitable and makes the microphone basically useless for practical purposes for any player who wants to be heard and/or have a decent sound. These are all part of my personal collection (and are not for sale), although I do occasionally have harmonica microphones for sale from my collection, or from my personal arsenal of usage.There IS a difference in microphones from one to the other, especially the bullet microphones.Certain model microphones () have particularly good tonal qualities and characteristics when held in the hand with a harmonica by a player who has good playing tone and technique on the instrument, coupled with a good gripping technique on the microphone.

Of course, some people just don’t care enough about it, and/or their ears aren’t paying attention to the difference(s).

And they make them the same as always as far as I know. I've met only 1 person who wouldn't use an RE20, because he thought it was too old.

But , apart from the foam becoming brittle over the years, EV mics in generally age very well. If a certain mic was used for radio, it may have been rewired internally for a different impedance and sound slightly different in a recording studio.

I have been collecting, restoring, re-building, and customizing vintage bullet microphones for myself and other harmonica players for over 20 years, and I have accumulated quite a collection of these microphones over the years ).

The majority of my collection is made up of variations of the two most popular “bullet-style” microphones used by harmonica players – the Astatic JT-30 style microphones, and the Shure 520/707A bullet-style microphones.

Of course, some people just don’t care enough about it, and/or their ears aren’t paying attention to the difference(s).

And they make them the same as always as far as I know. I've met only 1 person who wouldn't use an RE20, because he thought it was too old.

But , apart from the foam becoming brittle over the years, EV mics in generally age very well. If a certain mic was used for radio, it may have been rewired internally for a different impedance and sound slightly different in a recording studio.

I have been collecting, restoring, re-building, and customizing vintage bullet microphones for myself and other harmonica players for over 20 years, and I have accumulated quite a collection of these microphones over the years ).

The majority of my collection is made up of variations of the two most popular “bullet-style” microphones used by harmonica players – the Astatic JT-30 style microphones, and the Shure 520/707A bullet-style microphones.

I have three RE20s, two are of the same age and the other is about three years older. I find that the two that are newer sound brighter than the older one. Used to be that there were several taps that could be selected to change the impedance of the mic. Where can I send this mic for a reasonably priced repair (I heard EV will charge an arm and a leg!