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19-Feb-2020 03:58

Children actually participate in the social processes of adult activities, and their participatory learning is based upon what the American anthropologist Margaret Mead called empathy, identification, and imitation.

Primitive children, before reaching puberty, learn by doing and observing basic technical practices.

Instead, the entire environment and all activities are frequently viewed as school and classes, and many or all adults act as teachers.

As societies grow more complex, however, the quantity of knowledge to be passed on from one generation to the next becomes more than any one person can know, and, hence, there must evolve more selective and efficient means of cultural transmission.

For an analysis of educational philosophy, see education, philosophy of.

A primitive person, whose culture is the totality of his universe, has a relatively fixed sense of cultural continuity and timelessness.

The magnitude of change needed makes clear that closing the economic gap with developed countries will require major structural changes in schooling institutions. In this sense, it is equivalent to what social scientists term socialization or enculturation.

Children—whether conceived among New Guinea tribespeople, the Renaissance Florentines, or the middle classes of Manhattan—are born without culture.

This concentration of learning in a formal atmosphere allows children to learn far more of their culture than they are able to do by merely observing and imitating.

As society gradually attaches more and more importance to education, it also tries to formulate the overall objectives, content, organization, and strategies of education.

A primitive person, whose culture is the totality of his universe, has a relatively fixed sense of cultural continuity and timelessness.The magnitude of change needed makes clear that closing the economic gap with developed countries will require major structural changes in schooling institutions. In this sense, it is equivalent to what social scientists term socialization or enculturation.Children—whether conceived among New Guinea tribespeople, the Renaissance Florentines, or the middle classes of Manhattan—are born without culture.This concentration of learning in a formal atmosphere allows children to learn far more of their culture than they are able to do by merely observing and imitating.As society gradually attaches more and more importance to education, it also tries to formulate the overall objectives, content, organization, and strategies of education.The model of life is relatively static and absolute, and it is transmitted from one generation to another with little deviation.