Russian blond sexy dating

11-Dec-2019 21:59

On the Fischer–Saller scale, blond color ranges from A (light blond) to O (dark blond).It gradually eclipsed the native term "fair", of same meaning, from Old English fæġer, causing "fair" later to become a general term for "light complexioned".

For example, the OED records its use in 19th-century poetic diction to describe flowers, "a variety of clay ironstone of the coal measures", "the colour of raw silk", The hair color gene MC1R has at least seven variants in Europe, giving the continent a wide range of hair and eye shades.

Some linguists say it comes from Medieval Latin blundus, meaning "yellow", from Old Frankish blund which would relate it to Old English blonden-feax meaning "grey-haired", from blondan/blandan meaning "to mix" (Cf. Also, Old English beblonden meant "dyed", as ancient Germanic warriors were noted for dyeing their hair.

However, linguists who favor a Latin origin for the word say that Medieval Latin blundus was a vulgar pronunciation of Latin flavus, also meaning "yellow".

"Blond", with its continued gender-varied usage, is one of few adjectives in written English to retain separate masculine and feminine grammatical genders.

Each of the two forms, however, is pronounced identically.

For example, the OED records its use in 19th-century poetic diction to describe flowers, "a variety of clay ironstone of the coal measures", "the colour of raw silk", The hair color gene MC1R has at least seven variants in Europe, giving the continent a wide range of hair and eye shades.

Some linguists say it comes from Medieval Latin blundus, meaning "yellow", from Old Frankish blund which would relate it to Old English blonden-feax meaning "grey-haired", from blondan/blandan meaning "to mix" (Cf. Also, Old English beblonden meant "dyed", as ancient Germanic warriors were noted for dyeing their hair.

However, linguists who favor a Latin origin for the word say that Medieval Latin blundus was a vulgar pronunciation of Latin flavus, also meaning "yellow".

"Blond", with its continued gender-varied usage, is one of few adjectives in written English to retain separate masculine and feminine grammatical genders.

Each of the two forms, however, is pronounced identically.

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