Names of online dating scammers

07-Oct-2019 21:37

Once the victim's confidence has been gained, the scammer then introduces a delay or monetary hurdle that prevents the deal from occurring as planned, such as "To transmit the money, we need to bribe a bank official. " or "For you to be a party to the transaction, you must have holdings at a Nigerian bank of 0,000 or more" or similar.

This is the money being stolen from the victim; the victim willingly transfers the money, usually through some irreversible channel such as a wire transfer, and the scammer receives and pockets it.

Such people, who may be real but impersonated people or fictitious characters played by the con artist, could include, for example, the wife or son of a deposed African leader who has amassed a stolen fortune, a bank employee who knows of a terminally ill wealthy person with no relatives, or a wealthy foreigner who deposited money in the bank just before dying in a plane crash (leaving no will or known next of kin), and similar characters.

The money could be in the form of gold bullion, gold dust, money in a bank account, blood diamonds, a series of checks or bank drafts, and so forth.

According to Cormac Herley, a researcher for Microsoft, "By sending an email that repels all but the most gullible, the scammer gets the most promising marks to self-select." In Nigeria, scammers use computers in Internet cafés to send mass emails promising potential victims riches or romance, and to trawl for replies.

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419 scammers often mention false addresses and use photographs taken from the Internet or from magazines to falsely represent themselves.Other official-looking letters were sent from a writer who said he was a director of the state-owned Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation.He said he wanted to transfer million to the recipient’s bank account – money that was budgeted but never spent.In exchange for transferring the funds out of Nigeria, the recipient would keep 30% of the total.To get the process started, the scammer asked for a few sheets of the company’s letterhead, bank account numbers, and other personal information.

419 scammers often mention false addresses and use photographs taken from the Internet or from magazines to falsely represent themselves.

Other official-looking letters were sent from a writer who said he was a director of the state-owned Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation.

He said he wanted to transfer million to the recipient’s bank account – money that was budgeted but never spent.

In exchange for transferring the funds out of Nigeria, the recipient would keep 30% of the total.

To get the process started, the scammer asked for a few sheets of the company’s letterhead, bank account numbers, and other personal information.

More delays and additional costs are added, always keeping the promise of an imminent large transfer alive, convincing the victim that the money the victim is currently paying is covered several times over by the payoff.