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As a result, he has created and produced his own acts including Oaktown's 3.5.7, Special Generation, Analise, DRS, B Angie B, Stanley Kirk Burrell was born on March 30, 1962 in Oakland, California.

His father was a professional poker player and gambling casino manager (at Oaks Card Club's cardroom), as well as warehouse supervisor.

In the spring of 1988, a 107.7 KSOL Radio DJ Tony Valera played the track "Let's Get It Started" in his mix-shows—a song in which he declared he was "second to none, from Doug E.

Fresh, LL Cool J, or DJ Run"—after which the track began to gain popularity in clubs.

Stanley Kirk Burrell (born March 30, 1962), better known by his stage name MC Hammer, is an American hip hop recording artist, dancer, record producer and entrepreneur. Additionally, he starred in a Saturday morning cartoon called Hammerman in 1991 and was executive producer of his own reality show called Hammertime which aired on the A&E Network during the summer of 2009.

Hammer used some of the proceeds from this album to install a rolling recording studio in the back of his tour bus, where he recorded much of his second album.

Bust It spawned Bustin' Records, the independent label of which Hammer was CEO.

Together, the companies had more than 100 employees.

It was Hammer's stage show, and his infectious stage presence, that led to his big break in 1988 while performing in an Oakland club. Hammer had received several offers from major record labels before (which he initially declined due to his personal success), but after the successful release of this independent album and elaborate live dance show amazed the Capitol Records executive, Hammer agreed to sign a record deal soon after.

There he impressed a record executive who "didn't know who he was, but knew he was somebody", according to the New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll. Hammer took home a US

Hammer used some of the proceeds from this album to install a rolling recording studio in the back of his tour bus, where he recorded much of his second album.

Bust It spawned Bustin' Records, the independent label of which Hammer was CEO.

Together, the companies had more than 100 employees.

It was Hammer's stage show, and his infectious stage presence, that led to his big break in 1988 while performing in an Oakland club. Hammer had received several offers from major record labels before (which he initially declined due to his personal success), but after the successful release of this independent album and elaborate live dance show amazed the Capitol Records executive, Hammer agreed to sign a record deal soon after.

There he impressed a record executive who "didn't know who he was, but knew he was somebody", according to the New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll. Hammer took home a US$1,750,000 advance and a multi-album contract.

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Hammer used some of the proceeds from this album to install a rolling recording studio in the back of his tour bus, where he recorded much of his second album.Bust It spawned Bustin' Records, the independent label of which Hammer was CEO.Together, the companies had more than 100 employees.It was Hammer's stage show, and his infectious stage presence, that led to his big break in 1988 while performing in an Oakland club. Hammer had received several offers from major record labels before (which he initially declined due to his personal success), but after the successful release of this independent album and elaborate live dance show amazed the Capitol Records executive, Hammer agreed to sign a record deal soon after.There he impressed a record executive who "didn't know who he was, but knew he was somebody", according to the New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll. Hammer took home a US$1,750,000 advance and a multi-album contract.

,750,000 advance and a multi-album contract.

Hammer used some of the proceeds from this album to install a rolling recording studio in the back of his tour bus, where he recorded much of his second album.Bust It spawned Bustin' Records, the independent label of which Hammer was CEO.Together, the companies had more than 100 employees.It was Hammer's stage show, and his infectious stage presence, that led to his big break in 1988 while performing in an Oakland club. Hammer had received several offers from major record labels before (which he initially declined due to his personal success), but after the successful release of this independent album and elaborate live dance show amazed the Capitol Records executive, Hammer agreed to sign a record deal soon after.There he impressed a record executive who "didn't know who he was, but knew he was somebody", according to the New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll. Hammer took home a US

Hammer used some of the proceeds from this album to install a rolling recording studio in the back of his tour bus, where he recorded much of his second album.

Bust It spawned Bustin' Records, the independent label of which Hammer was CEO.

Together, the companies had more than 100 employees.

It was Hammer's stage show, and his infectious stage presence, that led to his big break in 1988 while performing in an Oakland club. Hammer had received several offers from major record labels before (which he initially declined due to his personal success), but after the successful release of this independent album and elaborate live dance show amazed the Capitol Records executive, Hammer agreed to sign a record deal soon after.

There he impressed a record executive who "didn't know who he was, but knew he was somebody", according to the New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll. Hammer took home a US$1,750,000 advance and a multi-album contract.

Burrell served as a "batboy" with the team from 1973 to 1980.

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Hammer used some of the proceeds from this album to install a rolling recording studio in the back of his tour bus, where he recorded much of his second album.Bust It spawned Bustin' Records, the independent label of which Hammer was CEO.Together, the companies had more than 100 employees.It was Hammer's stage show, and his infectious stage presence, that led to his big break in 1988 while performing in an Oakland club. Hammer had received several offers from major record labels before (which he initially declined due to his personal success), but after the successful release of this independent album and elaborate live dance show amazed the Capitol Records executive, Hammer agreed to sign a record deal soon after.There he impressed a record executive who "didn't know who he was, but knew he was somebody", according to the New Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll. Hammer took home a US$1,750,000 advance and a multi-album contract.Burrell served as a "batboy" with the team from 1973 to 1980.

,750,000 advance and a multi-album contract.Burrell served as a "batboy" with the team from 1973 to 1980.