Mandating the use

04-Feb-2020 21:40

Inga Saffron, The Inquirer's architecture critic, writes about architecture, design and planning issues.She was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in Criticism. As their housing costs have skyrocketed, pricing out the working poor and making it difficult for even middle-income people to find affordable housing, those cities have adopted laws requiring new developments to include subsidized units for low-wage workers.Although these guns are likely to be well-worn, they still could have considerable value as collector’s pieces, inexpensive shooting irons, and workpieces for customization.More details on the bill, and comments made by its sponser Rep.At the time of the complaint, all classes at this Lorraine school were conducted in English, and all course descriptions on its French Internet web site were in English only.The complaint invoked the Toubon Law to demand that the school's web site must be in French because the web site was effectively a commercial advertisement for the school's courses.

In the mid-1990s, soon after the Toubon Law came into force, two French lobbying groups—the Association pour la Défense de la Langue Française and the L'Avenir de la Langue Française—filed a complaint against Georgia Tech Lorraine, the Metz campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology.Her popular column, "Changing Skyline", has been appearing on Fridays in the paper’s Home & Design section since 1999. Now, a City Council member wants Philadelphia to join the club.In 2012, she completed a Loeb Fellowship at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. The difference, of course, is that Philadelphia already has some of the cheapest housing stock of any big American city.The law includes an exception that "these provisions do not apply to documents coming from abroad", but this exception has been interpreted narrowly by the appellate courts.For example, in 2006 a French subsidiary of a US company was given a hefty fine for delivering certain highly technical documents and software interfaces to its employees in the English language only, and this was upheld by the appellate court.

In the mid-1990s, soon after the Toubon Law came into force, two French lobbying groups—the Association pour la Défense de la Langue Française and the L'Avenir de la Langue Française—filed a complaint against Georgia Tech Lorraine, the Metz campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology.Her popular column, "Changing Skyline", has been appearing on Fridays in the paper’s Home & Design section since 1999. Now, a City Council member wants Philadelphia to join the club.In 2012, she completed a Loeb Fellowship at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. The difference, of course, is that Philadelphia already has some of the cheapest housing stock of any big American city.The law includes an exception that "these provisions do not apply to documents coming from abroad", but this exception has been interpreted narrowly by the appellate courts.For example, in 2006 a French subsidiary of a US company was given a hefty fine for delivering certain highly technical documents and software interfaces to its employees in the English language only, and this was upheld by the appellate court.Under the Toubon law, schools that do not use French as the medium of instruction are ineligible for government funding.