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24-Jun-2020 03:41

Bostrom’s sole responsibility at Oxford is to direct an organization called the Future of Humanity Institute, which he founded ten years ago, with financial support from James Martin, a futurist and tech millionaire. (He concluded that it was highly unlikely.) Discussions at F. Earlier this year, I visited the institute, which is situated on a winding street in a part of Oxford that is a thousand years old. Demand for him on the lecture circuit is high; he travels overseas nearly every month to relay his technological omens in a range of settings, from Google’s headquarters to a Presidential commission in Washington. His intensity is too untidily contained, evident in his harried gait on the streets outside his office (he does not drive), in his voracious consumption of audiobooks (played at two or three times the normal speed, to maximize efficiency), and his fastidious guarding against illnesses (he avoids handshakes and wipes down silverware beneath a tablecloth).

“Before the prospect of an intelligence explosion, we humans are like small children playing with a bomb,” he concludes.

best-seller: a dense meditation on artificial intelligence by the philosopher Nick Bostrom, who holds an appointment at Oxford.

Titled “Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies,” it argues that true artificial intelligence, if it is realized, might pose a danger that exceeds every previous threat from technology—even nuclear weapons—and that if its development is not managed carefully humanity risks engineering its own extinction.

“It was basically his only feedback,” Bostrom told me.

“The effect was still, I think, beneficial.” His previous academic interests had ranged from psychology to mathematics; now he took up theoretical physics. The World Wide Web was just emerging, and he began to sense that the heroic philosophy which had inspired him might be outmoded.

“Before the prospect of an intelligence explosion, we humans are like small children playing with a bomb,” he concludes.

best-seller: a dense meditation on artificial intelligence by the philosopher Nick Bostrom, who holds an appointment at Oxford.

Titled “Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies,” it argues that true artificial intelligence, if it is realized, might pose a danger that exceeds every previous threat from technology—even nuclear weapons—and that if its development is not managed carefully humanity risks engineering its own extinction.

“It was basically his only feedback,” Bostrom told me.

“The effect was still, I think, beneficial.” His previous academic interests had ranged from psychology to mathematics; now he took up theoretical physics. The World Wide Web was just emerging, and he began to sense that the heroic philosophy which had inspired him might be outmoded.

A reformulation of Pascal’s wager became a dialogue between the seventeenth-­century philosopher and a mugger from another dimension. has recently made striking advances—with everyday technology seeming, more and more, to exhibit something like intelligent reasoning—the book has struck a nerve. of Tesla, promoted the book on Twitter, noting, “We need to be super careful with AI. could threaten humanity, he said, during a talk in China, “When people say it’s not a problem, then I really start to get to a point of disagreement.