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It was a reproduction of the Japanese mural by the artist Hokusai, the joke being that this part of the catacombs is called La Plage, or the beach, because it s sandy.And as we hiked out just before dawn, the birds were already singing, and the city was quiet and lovely.National Geographic s Stephen Alvarez shows photographs to divers from the Paris fire department. Paris, City of Light, really is a tale of two cities. We were lonely explorers, traveling single file amid silent bones, rocks and countless antiquities in yawing, pitched quarry tunnels.And one of the dreamiest sights: Daniel s friend, Louis, lighting up the dead space with a breathtaking fire dance.

He showed us how the inspectors matched streets above to intersections below, and how they numbered the walls: G for Guillaumot, 1779, say, for the year, and 4 for the number of walls created in sequence that year. The muralist introduced himself to me as Psyckose, as many cataphiles use a nom de cave to escape detection above ground by police.

Put your feet like mine, our cataphile offered, adjusting his headlamp.

Below the city, concentrated on the south bank of the river Seine, hidden limestone quarries dating back centuries provided the stone for Paris great monuments like Notre Dame.

The mining left behind a labyrinthine maze — at least 180 miles of abandoned tunnels, secret rooms and caverns, odd wormholes barely big enough to wriggle through, running directly below some of the best-known city streets.

Along with Stephen Alvarez and the National Geographic crew, we slid down a ravine and trudged along an abandoned railroad.

He showed us how the inspectors matched streets above to intersections below, and how they numbered the walls: G for Guillaumot, 1779, say, for the year, and 4 for the number of walls created in sequence that year. The muralist introduced himself to me as Psyckose, as many cataphiles use a nom de cave to escape detection above ground by police.

Put your feet like mine, our cataphile offered, adjusting his headlamp.

Below the city, concentrated on the south bank of the river Seine, hidden limestone quarries dating back centuries provided the stone for Paris great monuments like Notre Dame.

The mining left behind a labyrinthine maze — at least 180 miles of abandoned tunnels, secret rooms and caverns, odd wormholes barely big enough to wriggle through, running directly below some of the best-known city streets.

Along with Stephen Alvarez and the National Geographic crew, we slid down a ravine and trudged along an abandoned railroad.

Jacki Lyden/NPR toggle caption Jacki Lyden/NPR Often, there is flooding. A burly man was touching up a mural of a long wave that ran along three sides of an underground chamber.