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Meaning is present in the form of “affordances” which structure an organism’s activities [2]. I have chosen to distinguish these aspects of the hand mark image because what is described as “signature”, viz the identity of a particular maker, is only decipherable through cultural knowledge, whereas “act-identity” is immediately accessible to any comer as a trace of an originatory action.In the case of human hand-marking, the rock surface, the hand, and the traced hand are to be seen in the light of Gibsonian affordances generating in the first instance minimal meaning relating to the hand-marking agent’s self-awareness as a negotiator of environmental spaces (distances, planes, obstacles, shapes and textures). Cultural meanings will differ from place to place, but the act of leaving a direct and recognisable trace of a hand provides a universal starting point for denotative elaboration.Other empirical studies centre on attempts to determine the age, gender, handedness, and numbers of “authors” involved.A study of technics—rigorously carried out through observation, data analysis, appeal to ethnography and, where warranted, a testing of the field of the possible through replication experiments—can further our understanding of the role of image-making activities. Sometimes a hand print will be called an “impression”: “Impressions are made by pressing the palm of the hand, which has been dipped in paint, to the rock” ([9], p. Unfortunately few of us are multi-lingual so a great deal of what the might offer us by way of insights into diverse, and sometimes divergent, approaches will be closed to many.Many digitised early printed books (including some examples supplied from the University of Glasgow) are available via Early English Books Online (EEBO) and Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) - both accessible through the Historical Texts database: - you can access these directly by searching for authors/titles using the library's quicksearch.19th century medical books Images from many of our books may be explored in our virtual exhibitions.

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Because we are eager to uncover what hand marks might add to our understanding of the human story there is an imperative to date them.For details and citations I refer the reader to my argument set out at length in “The case for hand stencils and prints as proprio-performative” [3], the companion piece to this article.A “proprio-performative” image is defined as one which addresses the viewer directly and in a way which conveys information about the artist-agent.With acknowledgement to Walsh, this technique was used by Lorblanchet (who had worked in Australia) in his well-known experiment reproducing the spotted horses panel at the French site of Pech-Merle [6,7], pp. Significant as the topic of stencilling is in general, the object of my inquiry is not stencilling as such, but the phenomenon of hand-marking.Hand-marking has created extraordinary sites around the world (from Patagonia’s Cueva de las Manos to Australia’s Carnarvon Gorge), sites which prompt us to ask why stencillers have so frequently and on such a large scale chosen to imprint their hands.

Because we are eager to uncover what hand marks might add to our understanding of the human story there is an imperative to date them.

For details and citations I refer the reader to my argument set out at length in “The case for hand stencils and prints as proprio-performative” [3], the companion piece to this article.

A “proprio-performative” image is defined as one which addresses the viewer directly and in a way which conveys information about the artist-agent.

With acknowledgement to Walsh, this technique was used by Lorblanchet (who had worked in Australia) in his well-known experiment reproducing the spotted horses panel at the French site of Pech-Merle [6,7], pp. Significant as the topic of stencilling is in general, the object of my inquiry is not stencilling as such, but the phenomenon of hand-marking.

Hand-marking has created extraordinary sites around the world (from Patagonia’s Cueva de las Manos to Australia’s Carnarvon Gorge), sites which prompt us to ask why stencillers have so frequently and on such a large scale chosen to imprint their hands.

Matters relating to the question of how pigment was/is applied, the placement and embellishment of images, the procurement and preparation of ochre, and the selecting and priming of surfaces, are discussed here—as well as the intriguing occurrence of variant hands.