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14-May-2020 08:57

Nymph and sage engaged in sex for some time, during which Viswamitra's asceticism was put on hold.As a consequence, Menaka gave birth to a daughter, whom she abandoned on the banks of a river.the nominative singular Ramas/Ramah (the deity Ram in Hindi), whose stem form is Rama.The nominative singular form is अप्सरास् apsarās, or अप्सरा: apsarāh when standing alone, which becomes अप्सरा apsarā in Hindi, from which in turn the English 'apsara' presumably is derived, the 'apsaras' form being the Sanskrit dictionary form.Apsaras represent an important motif in the stone bas-reliefs of the Angkorian temples in Cambodia (8th–13th centuries AD), however all female images are not considered to be apsaras.In harmony with the Indian association of dance with apsaras, Khmer female figures that are dancing or are poised to dance are considered apsaras; female figures, depicted individually or in groups, who are standing still and facing forward in the manner of temple guardians or custodians are called devatas.

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As ethereal beings who inhabit the skies, and are often depicted taking flight, or at service of a god, they may be compared to angels.

Monier-Williams Dictionary gives the etymology as: अप् √सृ, "going in the waters or between the waters of the clouds".

Apsarās are known as vidhya dhari or tep apsar (ទេពអប្សរ) in Khmer, accharā (Pāli) or a bố sa la tư (Vietnamese), bidadari (Indonesian and Malay), biraddali (Tausug), hapsari/apsari or widadari/widyadari (Javanese) and aapson (Thai: ).

They are youthful and elegant, and superb in the art of dancing.

They are often wives of the Gandharvas, the court musicians of Indra.

As ethereal beings who inhabit the skies, and are often depicted taking flight, or at service of a god, they may be compared to angels.

Monier-Williams Dictionary gives the etymology as: अप् √सृ, "going in the waters or between the waters of the clouds".

Apsarās are known as vidhya dhari or tep apsar (ទេពអប្សរ) in Khmer, accharā (Pāli) or a bố sa la tư (Vietnamese), bidadari (Indonesian and Malay), biraddali (Tausug), hapsari/apsari or widadari/widyadari (Javanese) and aapson (Thai: ).

They are youthful and elegant, and superb in the art of dancing.

They are often wives of the Gandharvas, the court musicians of Indra.

Here is one such list, together with a description of how the celestial dancers appeared to the residents and guests at the court of the gods: Ghritachi and Menaka and Rambha and Purvachitti and Swayamprabha and Urvashi and Misrakeshi and Dandagauri and Varuthini and Gopali and Sahajanya and Kumbhayoni and Prajagara and Chitrasena and Chitralekha and Saha and Madhuraswana, these and others by thousands, possessed of eyes like lotus leaves, who were employed in enticing the hearts of persons practising rigid austerities, danced there.