Dating an objectivist

12-Jul-2020 01:53

The interviewer, by the way, is from the same Francisco Marroquin University that we noted recently at the Atlasphere, for their pro-freedom political views.(Cross-posted from the Atlasphere's Ayn Rand meta-blog.) Inside Higher Ed Editor Scott Jaschik kindly sent a link to his new story "Buying a Spot on the Syllabus," which is indeed very interesting.He then blazed a trail uniquely his own among Rand admirers by creating The Atlasphere—an online networking and dating site for the fans of Rand's novels with particular emphasis on The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.Zader found inspiration in Rand's portrayals of independence and integrity, ...I could sit here and dismantle everything Ayn Rand ever said, but it couldbe a pretty boring circle jerk for those of us who don’t buy it, and adherents would just put on their ear muffs. The not very pressing question of whether Objectivism is an accurate description of/prescription for the world isn’t that interesting.The question of how Objectivism works is interesting. There are some resemblances to a cult that are documented elsewhere.The topic of Ayn Rand's personal life, how it could have affected her philosophy, and whether her overall philosophy is truly valid, has come up regularly lately on my Facebook timeline. Many who go through a phase of identifying closely with Ayn Rand's philosophy later come to disavow the term "Objectivist." Often one factor in their decision is simply that they can't stand the moralistic-antagonistic antics of those in the orthodox branch of the Objectivist movement, even though they still agree with the basics of Rand's philosophy.Others stop calling themselves "Objectivist" for more substantive reasons. I like inspirational novels with a significant moral message, such as Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead and Richard Bach's Jonathan Livingston Seagull.

With whatever talent I may have, I am trying to explore the ...

Last week I watched the DVD of Atlas Shrugged movie director Vadim Perelman's House of Sand and Fog.

(For more background about the Atlas Shrugged movie, I can't recommend highly enough Robert Bidinotto's new article "Major Updates on the Atlas Shrugged Movie" at the Atlasphere.) Since Perelman's going to be the proverbial "god" of the new Atlas Shrugged movie, I figured it would be worth witnessing his previous cinematic work first-hand. I can easily imagine some Ayn Rand fans liking the movie, and others actively disliking it.

“On the Atlasphere, every profile shows you what you want,” he says.

The 10-year-old site has seen a spike in membership in recent years—it has more than 16,000 dating profiles—after two “Atlas Shrugged” movies were released, says Mr. User handles include “Atlas in Arlington” and “Objectively Hot.” He founded the site after attending Objectivist conferences, where the “open secret” is that most people are there to meet potential partners. These reporters, like other visitors to the site, had to rate their bodies from “ample” to “very cuddly,” fill out a series of questions about their “virtues (and what they would change),” views on fitness, and their level of interest in the “cashflow game.” (The term “very cuddly” only seems to make sense if the site had been named “Atlas Hugged.”) Jokes about Objectivists and dating practically write themselves, but it’s astonishing a site like this doesn’t exist for other authors.

With whatever talent I may have, I am trying to explore the ...

Last week I watched the DVD of Atlas Shrugged movie director Vadim Perelman's House of Sand and Fog.

(For more background about the Atlas Shrugged movie, I can't recommend highly enough Robert Bidinotto's new article "Major Updates on the Atlas Shrugged Movie" at the Atlasphere.) Since Perelman's going to be the proverbial "god" of the new Atlas Shrugged movie, I figured it would be worth witnessing his previous cinematic work first-hand. I can easily imagine some Ayn Rand fans liking the movie, and others actively disliking it.

“On the Atlasphere, every profile shows you what you want,” he says.

The 10-year-old site has seen a spike in membership in recent years—it has more than 16,000 dating profiles—after two “Atlas Shrugged” movies were released, says Mr. User handles include “Atlas in Arlington” and “Objectively Hot.” He founded the site after attending Objectivist conferences, where the “open secret” is that most people are there to meet potential partners. These reporters, like other visitors to the site, had to rate their bodies from “ample” to “very cuddly,” fill out a series of questions about their “virtues (and what they would change),” views on fitness, and their level of interest in the “cashflow game.” (The term “very cuddly” only seems to make sense if the site had been named “Atlas Hugged.”) Jokes about Objectivists and dating practically write themselves, but it’s astonishing a site like this doesn’t exist for other authors.

He begins: Some professors at Marshall University believe that the institution has crossed an ethical line by accepting a gift that requires that a specific book — Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged — be taught in a course.