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19-Feb-2020 10:49

Farrah Fawcett and Ryan O’Neal were the Angelina and Brad of their day—dazzling sex symbol meets Hollywood hunk—until their stars were tarnished by drugs, infidelity, and family pathology.

In the last days of Fawcett’s life, as cancer stripped the masks from an all-too-human drama, the author shared O’Neal’s vigil, learning the true struggles and breakthroughs of their 30-year romance.

Although it proved the best-selling poster of all time, most people assumed that Fawcett’s popularity would be as transient as the vogue for her voluminously feathered hairstyle, and her initial success was often attributed to the erect nipple clearly visible under her red bathing suit in the infamous poster.

The blonde goddess suffered aging and illness just like Everywoman, and neither international celebrity nor formidable wealth could rescue her from the ravages of cancer and a heartbreaking death.

And yet the engines of popular culture seemed determined to process Fawcett’s final days into predictable formulas, chief among them our favorite romantic cliché.

Then came the news that she had cancer and the treatments that inspired her documentary, which startled the entertainment industry with its impact: an estimated nine million people watched when it was broadcast on May 15, delivering NBC’s highest ratings for that time period, other than the Olympics, in more than a year.

Fawcett was back in the headlines—as were O’Neal and Stewart, who were both hailed and excoriated for abetting a project that many saw as ghoulish and voyeuristic, turning a harrowing death in progress into the ultimate reality show.

Although it proved the best-selling poster of all time, most people assumed that Fawcett’s popularity would be as transient as the vogue for her voluminously feathered hairstyle, and her initial success was often attributed to the erect nipple clearly visible under her red bathing suit in the infamous poster.

The blonde goddess suffered aging and illness just like Everywoman, and neither international celebrity nor formidable wealth could rescue her from the ravages of cancer and a heartbreaking death.

And yet the engines of popular culture seemed determined to process Fawcett’s final days into predictable formulas, chief among them our favorite romantic cliché.

Then came the news that she had cancer and the treatments that inspired her documentary, which startled the entertainment industry with its impact: an estimated nine million people watched when it was broadcast on May 15, delivering NBC’s highest ratings for that time period, other than the Olympics, in more than a year.

Fawcett was back in the headlines—as were O’Neal and Stewart, who were both hailed and excoriated for abetting a project that many saw as ghoulish and voyeuristic, turning a harrowing death in progress into the ultimate reality show.

“As someone who used to be married to her, I can tell you that there’s no one who goes to bat for a friend the way Alana does.”But the public had grown cynical; sympathy for Fawcett notwithstanding, the years of turmoil had tainted attitudes toward the prototypical healthy, athletic blonde bombshell whom every guy wanted to date and every young woman wanted to emulate.