Current feminist theory in validating women39s own dating a girl with different political views

06-Apr-2020 02:15

Likewise, those assertions provided the basis of Marilyn Frye’s endorsement of separatist feminist practices.

Liberal, socialist, and radical feminism continue to challenge standard philosophical assumptions about the scope of politics and the nature of justice.

In the history of Western philosophy up to the 1970s, the topic of gender seldom arose, and when it did it was usually in the context of a rationalization of women’s lower social status and their exclusion from public life.

The exceptions to this rule, such as Plato’s (1861), were few and far between.

They particularly focused on protecting and extending the rights that enabled women to pursue self-chosen goals, such as reproductive rights (including the right to legally obtain an abortion) and rights to full educational and economic opportunities.

Whereas liberal feminists applied the core liberal values of freedom and equality to address women’s concerns, the Iris Marion Young appropriated Marxist categories, which were based on labour and economic structures.

According to radical feminists, male heterosexuality objectifies the female body and makes the domination and degradation of women a source of erotic stimulation.

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If bias against women was not incidental to philosophy but in fact one of its defining features, the potential ramifications of a feminist critique were boundless.

The most obvious results, as women philosophers noted, were omissions.

Until the late 20th century, women’s philosophical contributions were generally dismissed (if they were noticed at all), and issues of concern to women were ignored.

During that period women in many academic disciplines, including philosophy, began to question why there were almost no works by women in the canons of their disciplines and why there were so few women in their professions.

For feminist philosophers, part of the answer lay in the generally disparaging view of women that pervaded Western culture and was consequently reflected in the thinking of most male philosophers: compared with men, women were seen as irrational, emotional, unintelligent, and morally immature.

If bias against women was not incidental to philosophy but in fact one of its defining features, the potential ramifications of a feminist critique were boundless.

The most obvious results, as women philosophers noted, were omissions.

Until the late 20th century, women’s philosophical contributions were generally dismissed (if they were noticed at all), and issues of concern to women were ignored.

During that period women in many academic disciplines, including philosophy, began to question why there were almost no works by women in the canons of their disciplines and why there were so few women in their professions.

For feminist philosophers, part of the answer lay in the generally disparaging view of women that pervaded Western culture and was consequently reflected in the thinking of most male philosophers: compared with men, women were seen as irrational, emotional, unintelligent, and morally immature.

Much of their analysis concerned sexual and family relations, which were then considered private or personal matters that could not (or should not) be addressed by political means.