Army dating scam

20-Jul-2020 23:12

Phoebe decided to continue her relationship, despite the evidence that the man she was seeing wasn’t who he claimed to be. “I told her what she was getting into, and what to expect as the scam developed - but she went ahead with it.”You may be thinking “What’s the worst that can happen? In reality, these scams are real money spinners for the people behind them, and the perpetrators often extract thousands from their victims.

According to Melanie, they work in groups of up to 12, creating networks of fake profiles that support each other and provide the network with legitimacy.

However, the photos show a man who can’t be much older than his early to mid-30s.

Melanie informed Phoebe that things didn’t look good, and went ahead and tried to verify the identity of Peter by running a thorough background check.

Please share this article to make sure everyone knows the dangers of online relationships.

People need to know that unscrupulous individuals are stealing the good name of soldiers to manipulate people and take their money.

And, of course, be aware of common signs that a social media profile is fake.The emotional hold created by these relationships is often so strong that victims will end up approaching friends and relatives for cash in an attempt to scrape together the money that their ‘lover’ is requesting. Well, at first Melanie decided to leave it be - after all, she’d provided all the information that she could, and it seemed like she’d run out of options. “I decided to see if I can find the original “Peter,” the soldier whose photos they had stolen to create these profiles.” A few searches and a quick background check later, she had the Facebook profile of the original Peter, the man who’s identity had been stolen over and over.“The scammer will keep hitting up their client over and over again until they get wise, or can no longer pay. After that, it was a simple matter of emailing him with links to the duplicate profiles.For a start, all of his friends weren’t what you’d expect - not many soldiers and not much in the way of family”.Despite the profile having recent activity, posts from what appeared to be a continuous deployment, and even comments and praise from friends, there were plenty of signs that Peter’s identity had been faked.“You’d at least expect to see plenty of activity from loved ones, as well as posts about important life events like the birth of a niece or nephew, or the birthday of a sibling or parent.” Additionally, the man was claiming to be in his 50s, an appropriate dating age bracket for Phoebe, the client.

And, of course, be aware of common signs that a social media profile is fake.The emotional hold created by these relationships is often so strong that victims will end up approaching friends and relatives for cash in an attempt to scrape together the money that their ‘lover’ is requesting. Well, at first Melanie decided to leave it be - after all, she’d provided all the information that she could, and it seemed like she’d run out of options. “I decided to see if I can find the original “Peter,” the soldier whose photos they had stolen to create these profiles.” A few searches and a quick background check later, she had the Facebook profile of the original Peter, the man who’s identity had been stolen over and over.“The scammer will keep hitting up their client over and over again until they get wise, or can no longer pay. After that, it was a simple matter of emailing him with links to the duplicate profiles.For a start, all of his friends weren’t what you’d expect - not many soldiers and not much in the way of family”.Despite the profile having recent activity, posts from what appeared to be a continuous deployment, and even comments and praise from friends, there were plenty of signs that Peter’s identity had been faked.“You’d at least expect to see plenty of activity from loved ones, as well as posts about important life events like the birth of a niece or nephew, or the birthday of a sibling or parent.” Additionally, the man was claiming to be in his 50s, an appropriate dating age bracket for Phoebe, the client.These networks of scammers call their victims “clients,” and often communicate with many people simultaneously.